newspapers

14 Apr 2014

Orphans of the Titanic

orphans of the titantic sassy jane genealogy

Courtesy Library of Congress

Waifs of the Deep: Orphans of the Titanic is an interesting article over at Picture This, the blog for the Library of Congress’s photograph collections.

In honor of another Titanic anniversary today, let’s see how some 20th- and 21st-century crowdsourcing resolved a family’s identity.

The New York Evening World featured this heart-tugger in the aftermath of the sinking on April 20, 1912:

Who are the two little French boys that were dropped, almost naked, from the deck of the sinking Titanic into the arms of survivors in a lifeboat?  From which place in France did they come and to which place in the new world were they bound? There is not one iota of information to be had as to the identity of the waifs of the deep – the orphans of the Titanic.

Did the Orphans of the Titanic find their parents?

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2 Aug 2013

Updates to Chronicling America Historic Newspapers – Follow Friday

updates to Chronicling America historic newspapers sassy jane genealogy

Updates to Chronicling America Historic Newspapers is today’s Follow Friday. The Library of Congress announced the additions yesterday of 600,000 historic newspaper pages. First-time contributions are from Iowa, Michigan, and West Virginia. Other new additions include content from Hawaii, Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.

Chronicling America is my favorite historic newspaper site (and it’s always free). The latest stats: LC has added 6.6 million searchable newspaper pages from 1,100 newspaper titles, published in 30 states and the District of Columbia between 1836 and 1922.

22 Jun 2013

Obituaries from Chicago German-Language Newspapers for Gottfried Hann

Today’s topic is obituaries from Chicago German-Language newspapers for Gottfried Hann (1861-1896), my great-grandfather, as I continue trying to read 19th-c. German without actually knowing any.

HannGottfriedObitAbendpost

Chicago Abendpost, Samstag, den 17 October 1896, S. 4

Gestorben: Gottfried Hann, geboren am 2. May 1861 im Ladis, Tyrol, 35 Jahre alt. Gestorben am 17. Oktober 1896. Hinterlasst Frau und zwei kinder. Beerdigung findet statt Montag, den 19. Oktober. Nachmittags 2 Uhr. von 21 Dayton Str. Tyroler und Vorarlberger Verein Chicago. F.A. Mathis, Sekretär. Daniel Kulin, Pres.

Died: Gottfried Hann was born on 2nd May 1861 in Ladis, Tyrol, 35 years old. Died on 17th October 1896. Leaving his wife and two children. Burial will be held Monday, 19th October. 2 o’clock in the afternoon. [Funeral party leaving] from 21 Dayton Street. Tyroler and Vorarlberg Club Chicago. F.A. Mathis, Secretary Daniel Kulin, President.

(I left the Victorian hearse ad in there because it’s cool. Gottfried’s family couldn’t afford a get-up like that. In fact, he was buried in a rented grave and when they family couldn’t pay, they buried him deeper and resold the plot at Saint Boniface Cemetery in Chicago.)

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18 May 2013

Direct Me NYC 1940 – Find Your Elusive NYC Family Member

 

Courtesy NYPL

Courtesy NYPL

Direct Me NYC 1940 marries the 1940 census with the digitized phone books of all five boroughs of New York City. The user unites the two sets of data with the help of Steve Morse’s One-Step site. If you’re still struggling to find elusive NYC family members, this site can help. There’s an article up at the New York Times about the resource at the New York Public Library.

The project permits the user to cross-reference NYC residents’ names and addresses with the 1940 census data made public last year, which includes the person’s age, income, education, occupation, and residences in 1935 and 1940.

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