World War II records

18 Dec 2013

Czech Kindertransport and Sir Nicholas Winton

This is the story of a remarkable man – still with us at the age of 104 – named Sir Nicholas Winton, who saved 669 children from the Nazis between December 1938 and August 1939. Winton, a British stockbroker, established the Czech Kindertransport and worked with a team in Prague to save the children, most of whose parents perished at Auschwitz. Winton raised money, organized transports, and when necessary, forged papers to save the children.

Nicholas Winton and one of the children he rescued. (courtesy The Guardian)

Winton was so modest about his role in the Kindertransport that it was only revealed in 1988 when his wife Grete found detailed records in their attic. It contained lists of the children, including their parents’ names, and the names and addresses of the families that took them in.

Eighty of “Winton’s children” were located in Britain and reunited on the BBC […]

31 Aug 2013

Seeing History Through Dad’s Eyes

 

Japanese officials prepare to sign the surrender agreement on the battleship Missouri. Courtesy Associated Press/Max Desfor

Seeing History Through Dad’s Eyes is a wonderful piece up on the New York Times this morning in their series, Booming: Living Through the Middle Ages. It’s so nice I’d rather have you go read it than read about me reading it.

But one thing first: having an affinity for past times in which you did not live is something we genealogists attempt to explain to others. So I especially like this author’s take on bonding with her father over World War II. And her father has excellent taste in movies. If you haven’t seen In Harm’s Way, please stop what you’re doing and go watch it now. I’ll wait here and then we can bond.

22 May 2012

Tuesday’s Tip: New World War II Database Available

The Army Times reports that volunteers at the New York State Military Museum and Veterans Research Center have indexed and digitized 28,969 index cards for New York State soldiers called to active duty in the fall of 1940.

This collection was created when President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 8551 on 26 Sep 1940, ordering members of the National Guard into active military duty. The men of the New York Division reported for duty less than three weeks later when they assembled at their various armories around the state on 15 Oct 1940.

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22 May 2012

Tuesday’s Tip: New World War II Database Available

The Army Times reports that volunteers at the New York State Military Museum and Veterans Research Center have indexed and digitized 28,969 index cards for New York State soldiers called to active duty in the fall of 1940.

This collection was created when President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 8551 on 26 Sep 1940, ordering members of the National Guard into active military duty. The men of the New York Division reported for duty less than three weeks later when they assembled at their various armories around the state on 15 Oct 1940.

[…]