J. Joseph Edgette at the family mausoleum of Isidor and Ida Straus, founders of Macy’s, both of whom died on board the Titanic. Courtesy NY Times

J. Joseph Edgette at the family mausoleum of Isidor and Ida Straus, founders of Macy’s, both of whom died on board the Titanic. Courtesy NY Times

The New York Times had a nice piece the other day on the locations of memorials to Titanic passengers who died and graves of passengers who survived.

For the last hour, [J. Joseph Edgette, chair of the cemeteries and grave markers area of the American Culture Association] had been crisscrossing Woodlawn’s 313 acres, driving slowly and stopping to look at graves of passengers who died when the unsinkable ship went down 100 years ago, and survivors who were buried there later on. Of the passengers aboard the Titanic, more than 1,500 died, including more than 300 whose bodies were pulled from the water after the Cunard steamship Carpathia had picked up the survivors. (Of the bodies that were recovered, more than 115 were buried at sea. The rest were taken to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where 150 were buried in three cemeteries. The others were shipped out for burial by relatives.)

The Times also has a nice piece today on the NYC locations and archival collections that memorialize the Titanic and her passengers. Graveyards and archives – the delight of genealogists.