research tips

14 Jul 2014

Free E-book on Ancestry Search Tips

Family Tree University is offering a free e-book on Ancestry Search Tips, available for download here.

Titled 48 Ancestry Search Tips, this e-book contains “tricks, hints and hacks to unlock new family tree discoveries [and] helpful guides to using the genealogy website, including an exclusive excerpt from the Unofficial Guide to Ancestry.com by Nancy Hendrickson.” 

Ancestry.com likely holds answers to at least some of your family tree questions. The key to finding those answers is learning how to sift through the massive amount of ancestor data on the subscription genealogy website. Whether you want to use your paid Ancestry.com subscription more effectively, make the most of a free trial subscription or eke out whatever information you can for free, the pointers in our free e-book 48 Ancestry Search Tips will help you.”

3 May 2014

Immigrant Ancestors Talk at SLOCGS

Immigrant Ancestors Talk at San Luis Obispo County Genealogy Society today! This is one of my favorite presentations – “Coming to America: Castle Garden, Ellis Island & Immigrant Ancestors” – and it begins at 1:45 pm at 520 Dana Street, San Luis Obispo, California. The general meeting starts at 12:15 pm.

This talk is based on my new guide, Discovering Immigrant Ancestors, a 77-page PDF with 25 pages of active links to immigration and naturalization resources and an overview of immigration from Europe to America in the 19th and twentieth centuries.

There are five parts to my talk, as this is a hybrid of two presentations. In the first part, we’ll follow in the footsteps of European immigrant ancestors who approached America’s “front doors to freedom” through the Customs House, Castle Garden, or Ellis Island in the 19th and 20th centuries. The second part, I’ll talk about essential and little-known resources for finding […]

21 Mar 2014

Library of Congress Blogs – Follow Friday

This Follow Friday post is about Library of Congress blogs. The nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, the Library of Congress holds millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections.

Its name comes its original mission to serve as the research arm of Congress, a purpose it still fulfills today. The Library’s formal mission is to “support the Congress in fulfilling its constitutional duties and to further the progress of knowledge and creativity for the benefit of the American people.”

The eleven Library of Congress blogs certainly fulfill the latter part of their mission. The Library of Congress blogs are excellent resources, free to all, organized by broad historical subjects, and containing a wealth of information for researchers from the vast collections at the Library of Congress.

These Library of Congress blogs are of particular interest to genealogists:

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6 Sep 2013

Collection of Collections at CONTENTdm for Follow Friday

contentdmThe Collection of Collections site by CONTENTdm is today’s Follow Friday post. It gathers digital collections from a host of libraries and archives that use CONTENTdm‘s software to deliver digital collections to researchers.

Lots of attention in the genealogical research world goes to commercial (for-profit) digital collection sites like Ancestry or MyHeritage.

But there are many, many non-profit libraries, archives, and museums that are working hard to digitize and deliver their collections directly to users, usually for free. In these collections are genealogically rich materials such as yearbooks and oral history transcripts.

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