Sassy Jane Genealogy Blog

20 Sep 2016

Latest Image Software Recommendations

My latest image software recommendations are included in this post.  Choosing image software to help manage your family photos is an essential step in organizing family photos and records, and one that I cover in more detail in my e-book, Cataloging Family Photographs & Records.

Image software is used by genealogists to:

Create high-resolution master scans
Edit photos to resize, crop, and alter master digital files
Make changes to many photos with a batch edit
Add information to digital images using metadata
Search for images and retrieve them using keywords
Use special functions, such as creating albums, employing facial recognition or adding GPS linking

Windows or Mac Image Software
Photoshop Elements ($80-$100) – think of it as Photoshop Lite. Has powerful image editing capabilities, including GPS and facial recognition; easier to use than the full version of Photoshop, but still has a learning curve.

Many free tutorials available. Also has scanning feature. A 30-day demo is available […]

5 Sep 2016

Lewis Hine Project

The Lewis Hine Project documents the research of retired social worker Joe Manning. He set out in 2004 to see what had happened to the children featured in Lewis Hine’s heartbreaking photos of child labor in the United States in the early 20th century. The Lewis Hine Project documents his findings—showing the lives of hundreds of subjects—on his website, MorningsOnMapleStreet.com.
The Lewis Hine Project
Because Hine only recorded the dates and places of his photos, Manning became a researcher-genealogist to identify the children and find their descendants.

Manning set out to find the identity of the little girl in one of Hine’s most famous photographs.

The little girl staring out the window has no name and a very short story. At 10 years old, she had been working at Rhodes Manufacturing Company for more than a year…. I came up with a novel idea. I searched the 1910 Lincolnton census, and made a list of all […]

2 Sep 2016

Updates to FamilySearch Databases August 2016

There’s something for everyone in the new updates to FamilySearch databases August 2016:

COLLECTION

INDEXED RECORDS

DIGITAL RECORDS

COMMENTS

Maine & Massachusetts Case Files of Deceased and Deserted Seamen 1837- 1965

0

16,231

New browsable image collection.

United States World War II Draft Registration Cards 1942

0

882,986

Added images to an existing collection

Australia Tasmania Civil Registration 1803-1933

425,774

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Australia Queensland Maryborough Public Records 1847-1989

17,156

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Spain Diocese of Lugo Catholic Parish Records 1550-1966

19,557

76,329

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

California San Francisco Register of Chinese Immigrant Court Cases and Foreign Seamen Tax Cards 1883-1924

0

12,404

New browsable image collection.

Netherlands Gelderland Province Civil Registration 1800-1952

39,539

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Massachusetts Revolutionary War Bounty Land Applications 1805-1845

0

2,522

New browsable image collection.

New Hampshire Revolutionary War Records 1675-1835

0

8,821

New browsable image collection.

Maine Revolutionary War Bounty Land Applications 1835-1838

0

10,288

New browsable image collection.

North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers 1779-1782

0

97,668

New browsable image collection.

New Zealand Obituaries 1844-1963

14,545

2,385

New indexed records and images collection

England Lancashire Oldham […]

31 Aug 2016

Finding Norwegian Ancestors in Eiker

Finding Norwegian ancestors in Eiker, Buskerud, was the other half of my summer adventure. (The first half of my ancestral trip was to Ringebu, Norway.) My paternal great-great-great-great-great-grandfather, Jens Nielsen, was baptized on 20 Jul 1690, at the Haug Kirke (above) in Eiker. So many of my father’s father’s father’s ancestors (and more to find) were baptized, married, or buried from this imposing church.

When I married, I kept my maiden name of Loe. It’s not very old, but it’s unusual. Just three letters that most people in the United States try to make into four, or five, or six. When I’ve tried surname DNA matches, I find people from England named Low or Lowe who emigrated from England to the Carolinas in colonial times.

So I’m a Loe from Loesmoen, the name of the farm where my great-grandfather, Hans Christensen Loe, was born in almost exactly one hundred years before me (and my cousin Wanda) in 1854. The […]