genealogy

7 Dec 2014

Restoring Digital Family Photos

I’d rather have a root canal – and let’s be specific about no anesthetic – than fiddle with PhotoShop. So when I think about restoring digital family photos, I think of professionals like Landailyn CPR (Conservation, Preservation, Restoration). Proprietor and family photo wizard Janine Smith promises to “breathe life into your old photos.” And I’m here to say that she’s absolutely right, because she has been successfully restoring digital family photos for me.

The image you see above is of my grandmother, her parents, and her younger siblings. The original photographic print of this family group came to me in several pieces and I sent scans of them to Janine Smith the same way. That she was able to knit them together and compensate for the many deficiencies, restoring digital family photos, is a complete joy.

Landailyn is running a holiday special for Sassy Jane readers through December 31: $50 for […]

2 Dec 2014

New DNA Results For Richard III

Word today of new DNA results for Richard III.  In 2012, scientists extracted genetic material from newly discovered skeletal remains unearthed beneath a Leicester parking lot. The results revealed a 99.999% probability that the body was that of the Plantagenet king Richard III, interred at the former site of Greyfriars Abbey after his death in the Battle of Bosworth in 1485.

Interesting new results of continuing analysis of the DNA reveal that genetic material passed down on the maternal side matches that of living relatives, but genetic information passed down on the male side does not.

Professor Kevin Schurer of the University of Leicester notes, “We may have solved one historical puzzle, but in so doing, we opened up a whole new one.”

However, given the wealth of other details linking the body to Richard III, the scientists conclude that infidelity is the most likely explanation.

The researchers took all the information […]

10 Nov 2014

Veterans History Project – 2014

According to a Pew Research Survey, 61% of Americans have an immediate family member who has served in the military since World War II. Visit the Veterans History Project on the web at www.Loc.gov/Vets or watch the video above for information about how to participate. You’ll help the Library of Congress, honor your relative, and gain valuable information for your family history research.

Participating in the Veterans History Project is an excellent way to honor the military service of your relatives. A project of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, the Veterans History Project “preserves and makes accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war.”

The Veterans History Project collects:
  • Personal narratives, including audio- and video-taped interviews and written memoirs
  • Correspondence, including letters, postcards, v-mail, and personal diaries
  • Visual materials, including photographs, drawings, and scrapbooks

The Project collects […]

8 Nov 2014

Arkivdigital Swedish Records Free This Weekend

Arkivdigital Swedish Records Free This Weekend – apologies for the short notice, but those of us researching in Sweden should take advantage of this offer.

ArkivDigital features online archives containing church books (parish records) from the 1600s to 1894 for all of Sweden (household examinations, moving in and out records, birth, marriage and death records). Also available are many of the modern church books (1895-1942), including congregation books,moving in and out records, birth, marriage and death records that are available within Swedish record privacy constraints.

This weekend access is free to all available records.

Check to see what church books are available for a parish by going to www.arkivdigital.net and click on the section image database. (Swedish law limits access to records from 1929 to 1950 because it falls within the current restrictions on information from the last 70 years.)

ArkivDigital improves on the records available from LDS microfilm (about 100 million pages from the Swedish archives) […]