genealogy

19 Oct 2014

Where We Came From in the U.S.

Where we came from in the United States…and where we went is the subject of today’s post. These infographics from the New York Times illustrate domestic migration from 1900 through 2012. You know I love a good set of interactive maps for genealogy research and these are fascinating.

These maps use census data to illustrate where residents of each state were born. The map can also be reversed to show where people who were born in a particular state moved. Each state has its own complexities. Epic trends, such as European immigration at the turn of the century or the Great Migration of African-Americans northward during WWII, are made visible.

Arizona and Illinois are featured in today’s post. Click here to see infographics on each of the 50 states.

The New York Times writes:

The following charts document domestic migration since the turn of the last century, based on census data. For every state, we’ve broken down the […]

14 Oct 2014

Library of Congress Wants Your Family Halloween Photos

The Library of Congress wants your family Halloween photos from 2014. Are you photographing hayrides, haunted houses, parades, or trick-or-treating this year with adorable children and grandchildren? The Library of Congress wants you! (And I hope someday the American Folklife Center (AFC) will want vintage family photographs of Halloween like the one above.)

Library of Congress Wants Your Family Halloween PhotosThe AFC at the Library of Congress invites Americans participating in holidays at the end of October and early November – Halloween, All Souls Day, All Saints Day, Dia de los Muertos – to photograph hayrides, haunted houses, parades, trick-or-treating and other celebratory and commemorative activities to contribute to a new collection documenting contemporary folklife.

Between 22 October and 5 November, the American Folklife Center invites people to document in photographs how holiday celebrations are experienced by friends, family, and community, and post photos […]

4 Oct 2014

Sleep Like Your Ancestors

If you sleep like your ancestors did, is it better for your health? As an inveterate if unwilling insomniac, I’m always interested in ways to get to sleep. A wealth of primary sources indicates that our ancestors practiced “segmented sleep.”

According to historian Roger Ekirch, before the Industrial Revolution, our ancestors slept in two distinct phases, divided by an hour or so of wakefulness. Ekirch’s book, At Day’s Close: Night in Times Past, notes more than 500 references to segmented sleep. “It’s not just the number of references – it is the way they refer to it, as if it was common knowledge,” Ekirch says.

Primary sources describe a first sleep (or “dead sleep”) which began about two hours after dusk, followed by waking period of one or two hours, and then a second sleep (“morning sleep”).

During this waking period people were quite active. They often got up, went to the toilet or smoked tobacco and […]

26 Sep 2014

Ancestry Subscription Discount

ancestry subscription discountInterested in an Ancestry subscription discount? New or renewing Ancestry World Explorer subscribers receive a 30 percent discount with an AARP membership. The American Association of Retired Persons is a great organization offering a variety of discounts on travel and now on Ancestry subscriptions too. If you need to join AARP ($16/year, with discounts for multi-year membership), click here.

If you are an existing Ancestry subscriber, wait until you are a few days out from your renewal and call 1-800-514-4645 (7 days a week, 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. ET) to link your AARP membership to your Ancestry account for the discount. If you are a new Ancestry subscriber, call the same number to get started with the discount. Restrictions, according to the AARP site:

Offer good for valid AARP Members who wish to subscribe to the Ancestry.com® World Explorer membership for a one year […]