genealogy

19 Aug 2014

Google News Archive for German Newspapers

Today’s guest post is about using the Google News Archive for German newspapers. German-language newspapers published in the U.S. can be important sources for obituaries and other information on German immigrant ancestors. My Germanic Genealogy teacher, Carolyn Thomas, of the Santa Barbara County Genealogical Society, shares her insights on using the Google News Archive for German newspapers:

Besides the links to German-language newspapers in Chronicling America Nancy has shared, the Google News Archive has some German-language historic newspapers digitized and accessed by title at http://news.google.com/newspapers.

These were part of Google’s plan, unfortunately no longer supported, to digitize all extant historic newspapers. Some of us have benefitted greatly from the locations and newspapers with which Google began that effort.

For example, the following are German-language newspapers in Pennsylvania and Louisiana are available online at the Google News Archive for free:

Pittsburgh:

16 Aug 2014

Additions to National Digital Newspaper Program

NEH has announced the addition of South Dakota and Nevada to the National Digital Newspaper Program, a national, digital resource of historically significant newspapers published between 1836 and 1922.

The National Digital Newspaper Program’s website is Chronicling America, a free, searchable Library of Congress resource providing information about and access to historic United States newspapers.  To date, more than 7.8 million pages published between 1836 and 1922 are available on the site.

Awards were made to the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and the South Dakota Department of Tourism and State Development to digitize newspapers from Nevada and South Dakota.  This brings the number of participants in the program to 39, including 37 states, one territory, and the District of Columbia.

NEH and the Library of Congress are working to have every state and U.S. territory represented in Chronicling America.  In addition, supplementary awards have […]

14 Aug 2014

Finding Missing Marriage Records

Finding missing marriage records is today’s topic. If you are searching for an elusive marriage record, it may be useful to consider where the local Greta Green was located for your ancestral couple.

My post a few days ago covered the concept of “Gretna Green,” shorthand for any place where eloping couples could be swiftly married. Its origins lie in the English Marriage Act of 1753, which was designed to prevent upper-class men and women from “marrying down.” To circumvent this law, couples could elope to Gretna Green in Scotland, where marriage requirements were less strict.

FamilySearch says:

A Gretna Green is a favored marriage place. When a couple runs away from their home area to get married in a place with fewer marriage restrictions, the place they go is often called a “Gretna Green.” They may want to marry at a younger age, want to wait a shorter period after obtaining a […]

12 Aug 2014

Gretna Green and Marriage Records

Today’s post is about Gretna Green and marriage records. Stay tuned for a new post Thursday about finding elusive marriage records by locating the Gretna Green your ancestors may have used in the United States.

Gretna Green is used today as shorthand for any place where eloping couples could be swiftly married. Its origins lie in the English Marriage Act of 1753, which was designed to prevent upper-class men and women from “marrying down.” To circumvent this law, a couple could either obtain a special license from the Archbishop of Canterbury, or elope to Gretna Green in Scotland.

Gretna Green and Marriage Records

 

Gretna Green was a village just over the Scots-English border, and conveniently located on the main route from London into Scotland. Rather than petition the Archbishop of Canterbury, couples chose the easier path and fled north to Gretna Green, where “marriage by declaration” (aka […]