genealogy

22 Feb 2017

Genealogy on Facebook List Updated Feb 2017

The invaluable Genealogy on Facebook List updated Feb 2017. Compiled by talented genealogist (and my friend) Katherine R. Willson of Ann Arbor, Michigan, the Genealogy on Facebook List contains 10,600+ links to English-speaking Facebook groups & pages related to genealogy & history. Inspired by her success using Facebook to break down some of her brick walls, Katherine’s Genealogy on Facebook List is a gold mine of resources.

Katherine’s genealogy research on locations, subjects, time periods, ethnicity, societies, and other resources. The list is laid out well and easy to navigate and has a Table of Contents. The list is arranged by location or subject. Links for locations on Facebook include virtually every country from Australia to Zimbabwe; U.S. locations are broken out by state. Subject links run the gamut from adoption to surnames. The links include subject groups that collaborate only on Facebook, and links to existing organizations, libraries, archives, societies and […]

14 Feb 2017

Love Stories Found in Ex-Slave Narratives

Happy St. Valentine’s Day to my readers. Today’s post is about love stories found in ex-slave narratives at the Library of Congress. These narratives are available here: Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938.

Containing more than 2,300 first person accounts of slavery and 500 photographs of former enslaved people, these narratives were collected in the 1930s as part of the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP) of the Works Progress Administration, later renamed Work Projects Administration (WPA).  At the conclusion of the Slave Narrative project, a set of edited transcripts was assembled and microfilmed in 1941 as the seventeen-volume Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews with Former Slaves. In 2000-2001, the Library of Congress digitized the narratives from the microfilm edition and scanned from the originals 500 photographs, including more than 200 that had never been microfilmed.

The Library of Congress blog […]

3 Feb 2017

Searching the Historic American Buildings Survey

Interested in searching the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) to find a connection between an ancestor and a specific place?
HABS was established in 1933 when Charles E. Peterson, a young landscape architect proposed the project. It was initially founded as a “constructive make-work program for architects, draftsmen and photographers left jobless by the Great Depression. By creating an archive of historic architecture, HABS provided a database of primary source material and documentation for the then-fledgling historic preservation movement.”
Today, a division of the U.S. National Park Service (NPS) administers HABS, the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER), and the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS). Records include “556,900 measured drawings, large-format photographs, and written histories for more than 38,600 historic structures and sites dating from Pre-Columbian times to the twentieth century.” The collection is managed by the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress.
When I searched HABS for churches in Cook County, Illinois, I […]

13 Jan 2017

You Are in FamilyTreeNow.com Whether or Not You Want to Be

Right now, you are in FamilyTreeNow.com whether or not you want to be. Information about you and other living family members has been aggregated and is available for free. From the Washington Post, an article today entitled “You’ve Probably Never Heard of This Creepy Genealogy Site. But It Knows a Lot About You.” Abby Ohlheiser writes,
There are many “people search” sites and data brokers out there, like Spokeo, or Intelius, that also know a lot about you. This is not news, at least for the Internet-literate. And the information on FamilyTreeNow comes largely from the public records and other legally accessible sources that those other data brokers use. What makes FamilyTreeNow stand out on the creepy scale, though, is how easy the site makes it for anyone to access that information all at once, and free.

…Unusually for a site like this, FamilyTreeNow doesn’t require a fee, or even the creation of an account, to access […]

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