death records

22 Oct 2014

Ancestry Subscription Discount from AARP

Ancestry Subscription Discount from AARP - Sassy Jane GenealogyThe Ancestry Subscription Discount from AARP is for real! You can save $100 on an annual Ancestry World Explorer subscription if you are an American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) member. A few weeks ago, I published a post about the 30 percent AARP discount to Ancestry.com subscriptions for new or renewing Ancestry World Explorer subscribers.

There was confusion among readers and online about Ancestry‘s actual pricing for this subscription discount, so here’s what I learned when I called today to renew my annual subscription.

Membership levels:

There are now three levels of Ancestry subscriptions:

U.S. Discovery: All U.S. records on Ancestry.com ($20/monthly or $99/6 months but no discount through AARP)

World Explorer: All U.S. & international records on Ancestry.com ($34.99/monthly, $149/6 months or $104/6 months with AARP membership, renewable for another six months at the AARP discount rate)

26 Sep 2014

Ancestry Subscription Discount

aarp ancestry subscription discountInterested in an Ancestry subscription discount? New or renewing Ancestry World Explorer subscribers receive a 30 percent discount with an AARP membership. The American Association of Retired Persons is a great organization offering a variety of discounts on travel and now on Ancestry subscriptions too. If you need to join AARP ($16/year, with discounts for multi-year membership), click here.

If you are an existing Ancestry subscriber, wait until you are a few days out from your renewal and call 1-800-514-4645 (7 days a week, 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. ET) to link your AARP membership to your Ancestry account for the discount. If you are a new Ancestry subscriber, call the same number to get started with the discount. Restrictions, according to the AARP site:

Offer good for valid AARP Members who wish to subscribe to the Ancestry.com® World Explorer membership for a one […]

4 Feb 2014

Bills of Mortality – Tuesday’s Tip

Bills of Mortality records are the topic of Tuesday’s Tip and a new-to-me record group.

Containing the weekly mortality statistics for London, Bills of Mortality were compiled by parish clerks. Before the nineteenth century, Bills of Mortality were the main source of death statistics. The earliest known bill dates from November 1532, but the records mostly date to the period when they were used to track deaths from the epidemics, particularly The Great Plague of London. In 1570, baptisms were added and 1629 the cause of death was added. They were published through 1836, when civil registration supplanted these records.

Infant and child mortality rates were so numerous, according to historian Lynda Payne at Children and Youth in History, that they were listed according to age bracket, rather than disease. “Chrisomes” were infants younger than a month old; “teeth” were babies not yet through with teething.

The Bills of Mortality are listed by parish and by cause of death (“griping in the guts” was one picturesque, if vague, category) and do not include names. But if you have death dates and locations that match these records, they can lend some important context to your family research.

London’s Wellcome Library, of the world’s great collections for the study of medical history, just made 100,000 high-resolution images available for download from their archives. The new digital collection includes advertisements, paintings by artists both renowned and obscure, and early photographs.

Also included in the Wellcome Library’s digital collections are Bills of Mortality during the Great Plague in London from 1664-1665. Search “bills of mortality” at Wellcome’s Images page.

[…]

21 Nov 2013

The Search for the Lost Marines of Tarawa

“The Search for the Lost Marines of Tarawa” is a beautifully written piece by Wil S. Hylton in the The New York Times Magazine.

This week marks the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Tarawa. The battle lasted three days, costing 1,100 U.S. Marines their lives. As many as 520 Marines still lie in unmarked graves on Tarawa, despite a post-war recovery effort. Hylton’s piece features Mark Noah, a commercial pilot, who has devoted himself to finding and returning these remains to their families.

The Search for the Lost Marines of Tarawa Genealogy Genealogy
Courtesy New York Times

[…]