Home Movie Day 2011: Preserving Your Family Movies

Home|Family Photos & Records, Preservation|Home Movie Day 2011: Preserving Your Family Movies

Home Movie Day 2011: Preserving Your Family Movies

Today is Home Movie Day 2011. This celebration of home movies was started in 2002 by a group of film archivists concerned about what would happen to all the home movies shot on film during the 20th century. They knew many people have boxes full of family memories that they’ve never seen for lack of a projector, or out of fear that the films were too fragile to be viewed.

They also knew that many people were having their amateur films transferred to videotape or DVD, with the mistaken idea that their new digital copies would last forever and the “obsolete” films could be discarded. Original films (and the equipment required to view them) can long outlast any version on VHS tape, DVDs, or other digital media. Not only that, but contrary to the stereotype of the faded, scratched, and shaky home movie image, the original films are often carefully shot in beautiful, vibrant color—which may not be captured in a lower-resolution video transfer.

Home Movie Day 2011 has grown into a worldwide celebration of these amateur films, during which people in cities and towns all over meet their local film archivists, find out about the archival advantages of film over video and digital media, and—most importantly—get to watch those old family films! Because they are local events, Home Movie Day 2011 screenings focus on family and community histories in a meaningful way. They also present education and outreach opportunities for local archivists, who can share information about the proper storage and care of personal films, and how to plan for their future.

For more posts about caring for your family photographs and movies, click here.

And for helping organizing and cataloging your family history photographs and records, try Sassy Jane’s Guide to Cataloging Digital Family Photographs and Records.

Home Movie Day 2011

 

 

About the Author:

Nancy Loe has an MA in American History and an MLS in Library Science and Archives. She has appeared on PBS’s American Experience, at Rootstech, SCGS Jamboree, and state and regional genealogy conferences. Her website was featured in Family Tree Magazine's “Social Media Mavericks: 40 to Follow.”

One Comment

  1. Kathry 15 October 2011 at 7:27 AM

    Transfering home movies to video or CD is one of the best gifts your can give yourself and perhaps to family as well. It is such a blessing to be able to watch your loved ones that have passed on, and to see others in their youth. The tape becomes more precious with each passing year.

Comments are closed.